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The Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group has found that low income households are spending more on food and many have to borrow money for these groceries.

They say families may be spending 30% more than they did two months ago.

The organisation's researcher Julie Smith shares some of the contributing factors.

Because of the social distancing in combies and in supermarkets, women can no longer shop around for the cheapest prices and food runs out much quicker because children and workers are at home. Instead of running out in three weeks, it's running out in two weeks which means that women have to buy more food.

Julie Smith, Researcher - Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group

So if we add on the fact that shopping patterns have been disrupted, plus having to buy more food, plus the prices in the supermarkets having increased then actually what we're looking at is a 30% increase on the basket from March.

Julie Smith, Researcher - Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group

It also was to do with the disruption in the food supply chain that happened because of the [lockdown] restrictions.

Julie Smith, Researcher - Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group

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This article first appeared on 702 : [LISTEN] Grocery costs impacting heavily on families living on low incomes

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